Asbestos Inspections

When purchasing or renovating a new home, especially an older house, it’s a good idea to discuss asbestos inspections. New projects could disrupt dormant pockets of asbestos and send the fibers into the air, potentially harming family and friends.

 

If you suspect asbestos may be present in your home, ask yourself a few questions: Was your house built before 1980? Do you have popcorn or stucco ceilings? Or flooring tiles in your kitchen? Is your insulation made from something other than fiberglass? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might want to consider scheduling an asbestos inspection, especially if you have any remodeling or renovation projects on your radar.

Why inspect for asbestos?

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Asbestos is a common substance in most buildings, especially those built before 1980. The asbestos fibers are known for their durability and resistance to fire, heat, and electricity. This low-weight, low-cost material was used generously in many industries, even after reports of its toxicity began to surface.

 

In 1899, Dr. Montague Murray reported the first fatal case of asbestosis, an incurable (but not cancerous) condition in which fibers from asbestos are inhaled and scar the lung tissue. The condition will worsen over time, even after asbestos exposure has been reduced or eliminated. Also, asbestos exposure has been linked to many fatal cancers, including mesothelioma, lung cancer, throat cancer, and more.

 

Asbestos is a silent killer, with maladies often not appearing for years or even decades after exposure. If you suspect asbestos in your home or office, don’t attempt to identify or remove the material by yourself. Schedule an inspection with one of our qualified technicians.

 

Where to inspect for asbestos?

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Asbestos is prevalent in many buildings and structures, especially those built before 1980. It’s unfortunate the substance turned out to be toxic because it was a cheap and useful material for many projects.

 

Asbestos can be found all over a house from roof shingles to floor tiles. It was used to make gaskets, pipe insulation, joint fixtures, window putty, and cement. Levels of exposure vary by location and occupation, and some careers certainly put people around more asbestos than others. Some of the most common places of exposure include:

 

  • Chemical plants
  • Shipyards
  • Metal shops
  • Industrial sites
  • Construction sites

 

These occupations have the highest risk of exposure, but the prevalence of asbestos means it could be in any old house or building.

 

Asbestos is much more lethal when disrupted and sent into the air. The fibers are thinner than a human hair and undetectable to the naked eye. Our inspectors have the training and qualifications needed to assess your home or place of business properly.

Legal Requirements

The Canadian government recognizes the hazards posed by asbestos exposure and have rolled out regulation to limit its use. However, unlike some European countries, asbestos is still legal to produce in the United States and Canada. Russia and China combined for more than 50% of all asbestos mining, but nearly 10% still takes place in Canada. Asbestos can still be found in many North American homes, factories, offices, and vehicles.

 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) argued on behalf of asbestos-exposed workers since early reports of its toxicity. In 1986, the EPA finally acted, producing the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) which outlines training regulations for asbestos inspectors. Under a regimen called an Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan (MAP), state instructors are given a framework to teach technicians on proper management techniques. The state is free to conduct their training programs, but they must meet the strict guidelines laid out in the national asbestos MAP.

 

Additionally, the EPA passed the Asbestos Information Act in 1988, requiring companies still using asbestos to report how much was going into their materials. As regulations and information about its toxic became more prevalent, asbestos inspection and removal have become a big business. More and more industries are removing dangerous asbestos from their buildings out of safety concerns, and asbestos inspection and abatement have grown as a profession.

 

Inspection is often required by law when renovations to homes or buildings are proposed. Our team can help you wade through complicated asbestos regulations to get the assistance you need. Certification is essential when choosing asbestos inspection services and our experts are accredited in all the proper federal programs. Using uncertified companies could lead to delays or increased asbestos exposure. Asbestos inspection is a dedicated effort and should only be left to the experts.

 

Process and Procedures

The asbestos inspection process has several steps depending on the size of the structure, level of contamination, and type of asbestos fiber. Remember, leaving suspected asbestos materials alone is critical to preventing harm. Only let qualified technicians perform inspections.

 

Inspection durations can vary depending on the location, but most single-family home inspections can be completed within a few hours. Our technicians will go over essential areas like the kitchen, ceiling, and basement to determine whether removal is necessary.

If asbestos material is unexposed and not releasing fibers, removal may not be required.

 

Inspectors will note all materials and locations that could pose a hazard. If signs of declination are present, inspectors may sample the suspected material for testing in an accredited lab. Contamination levels can be tested through air, and material samples and then a service recommendation can be made.

 

Our technicians go through a detailed process with every inspection, no matter the size of the building or grade of the exposure. We can accurately survey your property and make the proper service recommendations. Contact us today and schedule your asbestos inspection.